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20130117
20130125
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> tensions are running high in some parts of turkey as nato gears up to get its missile defense system up and running this weekend. turkey has requested help because of concerns that the syrian civil war could spill over to its borders. the missiles have been sent by the united states, germany, and the netherlands, but not everyone approves of the move. on tuesday, a proud of -- a crowd of protesters. >> demonstrations against the patriot missile deployment have been taking place for days. the confrontation and threats against german soldiers reportedly arose from a protest like this one on monday. the five germans strolling through town in civilian clothing may have been mistaken for americans. turkish security forces managed to bring the germans to safety. the german government has called it a serious incident. >> this is unacceptable. against the backdrop of this incident, it will be necessary to speak closely with the turkish authorities about the threat posed to german soldiers. we expect our host country, turkey, to inspect the security of our soldiers when they move around in the c
country. while nato led forces move to a support role. military commanders are sending some soldiers back to school for a lesson in culture tolerance. nhk world's hideki yui reports. >> reporter: a somber mood takes over at the headquarters of international forces in kabul evy suay during a weekly ceremony to remember troops killed in afghanistan. >> we should know that the heroes we honor today will not have died in vain. amen. >> reporter: some 400 foreign soldiers died last year in afghanistan. at least 61 were victims of insider attacks. that's about 30 times the number five years ago. rising anti-u.s. sentiment in afghanistan is partly to blame. angry afghans took to the streets last february after the burning of copies of the koran by u.s. military personnel. amid deep religious and cultural differences many afghan soldiers feel humiliated by foreigners' behavior. >> translator: if an american soldier crosses his legs, it makes me angry and i tell him to stop. >> reporter: insurgents are taking advantage of such emotions. this taliban pr video praises a former afghan soldier who kil
will put general john allen ford for the top nato job. tuesday he was cleared of misconduct over a series of emails he sent to a woman in florida. the accusations were made during the sex scandal that forced his former boss, general david petraeus, to resign as cia director. the u.s. defense secretary is poised to lift the ban on women serving in combat. it will open hundreds of thousands of frontline positions to females. officially, this is a major change, but on the ground, women are already involved in combat. >> since the founding of the country, it has been a core u.s. belief only straight men should fight in combat. under the obama administration, the prohibition on being openly gay was lifted. now, with little fanfare, the last restriction -- keeping women on the sidelines will be thrown out thursday. within a year, women who serve in the military -- they make up 14% of the force -- will be eligible to apply for 230,000 new jobs. the reason, the last two u.s. wars. >> there are no frontlines anymore. if you go all the way back to the civil war, you had a front line in the clear ba
that the white house is going to proceed with a nomination of general allen to be the nato supreme allied commander now that he's been cleared by the pentagon investigation going back to the petraeus case. thanks to all of you, david sanger and kelly o'donnell, of course, and chris cillizza, see you later. thanks very much. >>> clinton today put a lot of blame on congress for withholding aid. >> we have to get our act together between the administration and congress. if this is a priority and if we are serious about trying it help this government stand up security and deal with what is a very dangerous environment, from east to west, then we have to work together. i also hope we're looking forward, because right now, libya is still dangerous, it is still in a very unstable status, and whatever we can do for them, we at least ought to agree we need to do and get out there and start delivering. >> one of the members of the senate foreign relations committee, who is asking questions, is the new hampshire senator jean chacin, former governor, democratic member of the committee, who was in the
revolution. >> nato has to do -- if france is attacked, we'd help defend france. it doesn't mean if france goes to war, we go to war. >> it's something that is felt between allies. >> do you think we'll gain everything from helping out-- >> obama doesn't want to get involved but i think we have to help in terms of what we're doing right now. >> u.s. is not involved but these are former french colonies. they have an opgaition and a -- obligation and a cultural history that ties them to those two countries but they don't do anything without the united states making a move. >> it's a thin edge of the wedge. the camel's nose in the tent. you know what i mean? the camel goes in the tent. we're going to go into the mali tent. is that the name of the game? the first thing that's going to occur to americans when they see and hear this. >> the camel has been in the tent in iraq and in afghanistan. the camel is going to be very nervous. >> you remember how we >>> [ inaudible conversation ] >> in cavern decided exchange last year with outgoing russian president, president obama was caught unaware, fi
as a nato treaty with western europe, defend ourselves, and international treaty. there's plenty of trade treaties. same thing. i am criticizing the book supranational or transnational, think of the transcontinental railway, something across nation. so the term transnational is used and that's distinguished from international. those are some of the ideas you could stick in the refit little now. what are global or transnational lives? what are global laws and rules mean? where are the twin pillars? liberty consent. i'll give you one example of national security policy in one example from domestic policy. let's look at the laws of war. united states is a party to the geneva conventions of 1949. the original geneva conventions at the traditional laws of war were radically altered in 1977 by the addition of additional protocol one to the geneva conventions. protocol one was supported during negotiations by the group of 77, soviet bloc at the time, the speeds, the swiss, many human rights groups, many ngos, nongovernmental organizations including international committee of the red cross. proto
and hostilities are concerned. we will take it from nato and the u.n. to, clearly a violation of the constitution. host: any reaction? guest: that is over the top because nobody in the a restoration has ever said they would ignore congress and only listen to the u.n. and nato. i have been critical of this administration, too. i have been critical of certain policies in places like afghanistan or iraq, but let's keep our differences on the policy level. let's acknowledge the fact that secretary clinton and her colleagues are honest policymakers trying to do the best job they can in a typical set of circumstances. let's not question their motives. let's focus on genuine policy differences. i have those policy differences with this administration. it is crazy to me to engage in all of this conspiracy theory and name-calling. >> what do you think will be the biggest -- host: what do you think will be the biggest concern, or two, with this administration? guest: my concern is that you will see more retreat and retrenchment from this administration. my concern is that the administration pursued a fairl
was going to become engaged through nato in ways that met our interest, i think, at the time, and got the job done. i thought it was smart. i thought the way he approached that was, in fact, very effective. and the results, obviously, were exactly what we wanted to achieve. we could tell if we did this, senator mccain you were deeply involved in that, we recommended no fly. we pushed for certain things, and those things were put into place. and it was affected without american boots being put on the ground at a time where we had just come out of iraq and we have american soldiers, largest number, in afghanistan. and so i think the american people approved of the way in which that was handled. now, the aftermath of all of these places -- i asked every member of the committee, we need to spend some time on this, all of us. there is a monumental transformation taking place. this is the biggest upheaval in that part of the world since the ottoman empire. since it came apart. as all of us know, many of the countries lines drawn, were drawn in relatively arbitrary fashion. people were put i
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)